Thursday, 21 May 2015

Rubbers and Erasers for Artists

There are a huge range of artists rubbers and erasers available on the market today, each with unique qualities to suit different situations and art styles. Here is a short overview of some of the types of eraser and brands we stock here at George Weil.

Natural Indian Rubber EraserNatural Rubber Erasers

The Daler Rowney Mystic Eraser is made from India rubber, harvested in the form of latex by tapping trees. Natural rubber erasers are flexible and soft, meaning they are useful on delicate papers and canvases. Natural rubber degrades with time, and will perish unless it is vulcanised.

Before the invention of vulcanisation to cure rubber and make it a feasible material, people used rolled pieces of white bread to rub away mistakes or lighten markings on their work.

Synthetic Rubber Erasers

Synthetic rubber erasers are the most commonly used erasers for day to day correction and are probably the 'rubbers' you remember from school. They come in a variety of shapes and colours, and are almost always the type of rubber you find attached to the end of your pencil.


Soft Vinyl Eraser Soft Vinyl Erasers

Soft vinyl erasers, also known as plastic erasers, are more specialised for removing light marks and for precision erasing. They are soft and non-abrasive, making them less likely to damage canvas or paper and erase cleaner in small areas than standard synthetic rubber erasers.

Modern examples of vinyl erasers include the Pentel Clic Eraser Pen, a refillable eraser holder which retracts the eraser tip. This concept has been taken further by companies like Jakar and Derwent who make a battery operated eraser tip, that spins inside the handle to allow for precision corrections.

Electric rotating eraser pen
The Derwent battery operated eraser
Medium Kneaded EraserKneaded Erasers

Kneaded erasers, or putty rubbers, are the artists choice when it comes to graphite, charcoal and soft pastel removal. The texture of a kneaded eraser is similar to gum, and can be manipulated into any shape required by the user. This type of eraser does not wear away and crumble like others do because drawing dust is picked up and absorbed into them. The rubber will eventually reach a point where it becomes saturated with debris and begin to make marks rather than remove them. Kneaded erasers are available in different levels of hardness, ranging from the super soft to very firm.

Wednesday, 29 April 2015

Learn How to Knit - Casting On

There are a number of ways to cast on. This method creates a chain of knit stitches on the needle.

Once you have mastered this method of casting on, you are not far off learning the knit stitch (also known as the garter stitch). With this basic stitch you will be able to knit a scarf, fabric blocks, cushion covers, a bag and more.

We have used a chunky yarn and size 12 Surina Knitting Needles and the instructions are for right handed knitters!

1. Make a loop and tie with a slip knot ~


2. Put the loop onto the left hand needle and push the right hand needle into the loop from underneath. Bring the yarn around from the right, underneath the bottom needle and up over between the cross ~


3. Now for the hard bit, and not very easy to illustrate. With the bottom needle, use the point to pull the yarn through the slip loop ~


4. Gently pull the loop formed on the top (right hand) needle and transfer it to the left hand needle ~


5. Push the right hand needle into the new loop and repeat the steps above until you have a row of 10 stitches on your needle ~


6. Now you are ready to learn the knit stitch...



Many of the knitting books featured on this site include information on the different stitches as well as guidance on how to understand knitting patterns and the terms used in this craft.